Social Media And Your Wedding Day — Read This Before You Create A Hashtag

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Photo via Luxuo.

Viral videos of choreographed dances, rapped speeches, and unique vows are spilled across the Internet, and with recent news of Kim Kardashian and Kanye West spending half their honeymoon retouching wedding photos for Instagram, the importance of social media in the wedding space seems to be on everyone’s minds.

How much exposure is too much exposure on your big day? Photographers and videographers are hired to capture every emotion-filled moment, so is it necessary to have guests snapping all of the moments in between? In a recent survey, David’s Bridal asked brides when and where social media should fit into the wedding day.

When it comes to planning, social media can be a huge asset. Along with gathering ideas on Pinterest, you can use other forms of social media, like Twitter and Facebook, to collect vendor recommendations, review portfolios and instantly connect with your preferred photographers, caterers and florists.

According to the “What’s On Brides’ Minds” survey, some of the biggest posting drama revolves around the wedding dress. 62 percent of brides believe that bridesmaids should not post any photos of the gown, let alone the bride in the gown, before the ceremony and 58 percent believe the bride and groom should be the first to post a photo from their wedding.

So is taking a selfie at the altar to post on Instagram a little much? Or does tweeting #justmarried while getting whisked away to the reception make it less magical? Only 14 percent of brides said that they would ban social media outright, opting for an unplugged wedding. While 26 percent said they would encourage posting to Twitter, Facebook and Instagram with a special wedding hashtag.

The general consensus, according to the survey, seems to be that social media posts are acceptable, as long as there are rules involved to ensure proper etiquette. 44 percent of brides said they would allow guests to post photos within certain parameters (like asking for smartphones to be switched off during the ceremony) to ensure loved ones aren’t completely consumed with their devices during the big day.

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