These Are The Biggest Wedding Décor Colour Palette Trends

Brittany Frid creative director of Frid Events works on a recent colour-rich summer wedding. All photos: Design/Coordination/Florals/Stationery/Decor by Frid Events. Photography by Scott H. Wilson. Venue: Rockport Barn.

“The whole wedding industry is SO over the colour blush!”

Brittany Frid, Creative Director of Frid Events speaks the truth. Likely most of the weddings you have seen in the last five years incorporated this soft shade in to the mix but honestly in 2019 (and moving in to 2020), it’s time to say bye-bye. “Blush is such a popular colour because it’s timeless and romantic, but there are other ways to have an elegant wedding while also doing something unique,” Frid explains. “I find couples who gravitate towards blush simply aren’t sure how to experiment with colour or are afraid of their choices will look too bold or tacky. If you are more comfortable with soft neutrals but want to modernize your palette, try swapping blush for a pale mauve or a light butter yellow. If you still like blush but want to push yourself out of your comfort zone, try experimenting with apricot, terracotta (very trendy right now!) or burgundy if you’d like to keep a classic touch. Push those boundaries because I feel many people are not as vanilla their wedding palette would suggest!”

So what does Frid see as the biggest colour trend in wedding décor palettes? She says bright and bold hues are on the rise and says her and her team have recently seen some seriously bright and experimental palettes come to life. “This is so refreshing! We’re really seeing a strong tone-on-tone trend emerging with saturated colours reminiscent of the 70’s. Think cherry red paired with bubblegum pink, taupe with terracotta, even pastel yellow and mustard.”

Frid says if you are considering your wedding palette and want to try something fresh and fun try this exercise: take your favourite neutral and find the undertone in it, and then exaggerate the undertone. “For example, the colour ivory looks white but it has yellow undertones, so we would pair it with a dijon hue, or even with chartreuse which is poppy yellow/green.”

When you do find that dream palette, keep it consistent from invitation to reception. This will set the tone for the day and helps establish what your guests can expect from the wedding day in terms of style and formality. We recently designed this really fun summer wedding where we used a rich forrest green as the base colour and accented it with berry tones and pops of coral,” Frid shares. The green was classic and sophisticated and the pops of fuchsia, burgundy, copper and peach were just enough to make it fun, summery and a little wild. This elegant yet vibrant colour palette was first used in the invitation and followed through with the forrest green linens, bright florals, burgundy candlesticks, ceremony arch, napkin colours and even in a huge champagne wall. We really pushed every tone in the whole palette in every decision we made, and it created a consistent, three-dimensional event.”

Having your palette balanced throughout your celebration is key says Frid. Just like fashion, you never want to take things into the much-too-much zone. Frid suggests once you find your base colour, choose up to five accent colours to compliment it.

“Each of the accent colours should somehow be connected. A good way to see if they’re connected would be to use paint chips and select colours on the same chip. Another way would be to take the primary flower you are using at your wedding and identify all the colours within that flower. For example, peach foxglove has a spectrum of colours that sound strange together on paper but look beautiful together: butter yellow, peach, darker apricot and burgundy. When these colours are placed on the base colour, they’ll look cohesive and deep instead of a random mix.”

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